All posts in Weight Loss

Sleep Deprivation Promotes Overeating, Study Says

Sleep Deprivation Promotes Overeating, Study Says

A new study, published  in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, found that sleep-deprived people consume an average of 385 calories more per day. Lead researcher Dr Gerda Pot, of the Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences Division at King’s College London says, “There may be some truth in the saying, “early to bed, early to rise, makes a man healthy and wise”.

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Don’t Blame Your Genes If You Don’t Lose Weight

Don’t Blame Your Genes If You Don’t Lose Weight

You may be right in thinking that your genes may be at least partly responsible for your being overweight, but an extensive new study shows that you can’t  blame your genes for failing to lose weight.

A gene known as FTO makes carriers of the gene more  likely to be overweight. However, according to a study published in the British Medical Journal researchers at Newcastle University, carrying this gene does not prevent a person form losing weight.

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Obesity Linked To More Types of Cancer

Obesity Linked To More Types of Cancer

As reported in The New England Journal of Medicine, researchers have identified eight additional types of cancer linked to excess weight and obesity: stomach, liver, gall bladder, pancreas, ovary, meningioma , thyroid cancer and the blood cancer multiple myeloma. And the data suggests that avoiding obesity could help to reduce the risk of these cancers.

This study utilizing researchers around the world, reviewed more than 1,000 studies of excess weight and cancer risk analyzed by the WHO’s International Agency for Cancer on Research. In 2002, this same group of cancer researchers found  evidence linking excess weight to higher risks of cancers of the colon, esophagus, kidney, breast and uterus.

Graham Colditz, MD, DrPH, a cancer prevention expert at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis says,”The burden of cancer due to being overweight or obese is more extensive than what has been assumed. Many of the newly identified cancers linked to excess weight haven’t been on people’s radar screens as having a weight component.”

“Lifestyle factors such as eating a healthy diet, maintaining a healthy weight and exercising, in addition to not smoking, can have a significant impact on reducing cancer risk” he said. “Public health efforts to combat cancer should focus on these things that people have some control over.”

For most of the cancers on the newly expanded list, the researchers also see that greater the degree of being overweight,  the greater the cancer risk. And the cancer risk that the study found, the same for both men and women.

“Significant numbers of the U.S. and the world’s population are overweight,” Dr. Colditz says. “This is another wake-up call. It’s time to take our health and our diets seriously.”

For more of the latest in nutritional/ lifestyle research check all of my blog posts at www.drsobo.com/blog

For the best care in Integrative Medicine call Henry C. Sobo, M.D., at 203-348-8805 or write us at optimalhalth@optonline.net

 

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Brains of Overweight People ‘Ten Years Older’ Study Shows

Brains of Overweight People ‘Ten Years Older’ Study Shows

The team studied data from 473 individuals between the ages of 20 and 87, at the Cambridge Centre for Aging and Neuroscience.

Research study author Dr Lisa Ronan says, “As our brains age, they naturally shrink in size, but it isn’t clear why people who are overweight have a greater reduction in the amount of white matter. We can only speculate on whether obesity might in some way cause these changes… ”

Senior author Professor Paul Fletcher, says “We’re living in an aging population, with increasing levels of obesity, so it’s essential that we establish how these two factors might interact, since the consequences for health are potentially serious. It will also be important to find out whether these changes could be reversible with weight loss, which may well be the case.”

For more of the latest in nutritional/ lifestyle research check all of my blog posts at www.drsobo.com/blog

For the best care in Integrative Medicine call Henry C. Sobo, M.D., at 203-348-8805 or write us at optimalhalth@optonline.net

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Moderate Better than Strenuous Exercise for Preventing Diabetes, Study Suggests

Moderate Better than Strenuous Exercise for Preventing Diabetes, Study Suggests

A new study from Duke University published in the journal Diabetologia, suggests that walking briskly may be more effective than  jogging for improving glucose control for individuals who are pre-diabetic.

One hundred and fifty individuals who were diagnosed with pre-diabetes were studied for 6 months. To assess the effect of the different types of exercise on blood glucose levels, they divided participants into three groups who given the  instructions for engaging in different types of exercise, and told not change their diets . One group was labeled  low-amount of exercise at moderate intensity (walking briskly for 7.5 miles per week). Another group was labeled high-amount of exercise at  moderate intensity (walking briskly for 11.5 miles per week). And the third group was labeled high-amount at vigorous intensity (jogging for 11.5 miles per week).

Researcher Dr William Kraus says, “We wanted to know …  which intensity of exercise is better for controlling metabolism in individuals at risk for diabetes.”

Participants in the moderate-intensity, 11.5-mile group saw a 7 percent improvement in glucose tolerance on average. The moderate-intensity, 7.5-mile group had a 5 percent improvement on average. The lowest improvement was seen among those in the vigorous-intensity, 11.5-mile group, with only a 2 percent average

Research author Willian Kraus explains, “High-intensity exercise tends to burn glucose more than fat, while moderate-intensity exercise tends to burn fat more than glucose. We believe that one benefit of moderate-intensity exercise is that it burns off fat in the muscles, which relieves the block of glucose uptake by the muscles. That’s important because muscle is the major place to store glucose after a meal.”

The study’s authors say that further study would be needed to determine whether moderate-intensity exercise is actually superior to high-intensity exercise at preventing those  pre-diabetes from progressing to full blown diabetes.

Dr Kraus says that  the study’s results could provide manageable alternatives for pre-diabetic patients. “When faced with the decision of trying to do weight loss, diet, and exercise versus exercise alone, the study indicates you can achieve nearly 80 percent of the effect of doing all three with just a high amount of moderate-intensity exercise.”

For more of the latest in nutritional/ lifestyle research check all of my blog posts at www.drsobo.com/blog

For the best care in Integrative Medicine call Henry C. Sobo, M.D., at 203-348-8805 or write us at optimalhalth@optonline.net

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Obesity linked to increased risk of multiple sclerosis

Obesity linked to increased risk of multiple sclerosis

Research published in PLOS Medicine by Dr. Brent Richards of the Jewish General Hospital, Quebec, shows that obesity in early adulthood is associated with an elevated  risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS).  MS is a progressive neurological disorder which involves immune system dysfunction resulting in damage to the myelin sheath which surrounds the nerves in the spinal cord and the brain.

The team, composed of researchers in Canada and the UK, investigated whether genetically determined obesity was associated with a greater risk of developing Multiple Sclerosis.

“These findings may carry important public health implications because of the high prevalence of obesity in many countries”

Taking into account that other previous research pointing in this direction Drs. Alberto Ascherio and Kassandra L. Munger say that this helps to confirm that indeed, obesity in early life is causally related to the risk of developing multiple sclerosis risk and provides a further rationale for obesity prevention.”

What their research found was that an increase in  body mass index from the overweight to the obese category   an average size adult woman increasing in weight from approximately 150 to 180 pounds) was associated with an increase of about 40% in the risk of MS.

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Obesity, Insulin Resistance Increases Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease

Obesity, Insulin Resistance Increases Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease
A new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Neurology  finds a strong association between insulin resistance and decline in memory function, and the development of Alzheimer’s disease. The fact that obesity increases the risk of heart disease and some cancers is well known, but this study alerts us that the risk of memory loss is also a consequence we need to understand and act upon. Insulin resistance is common in people who are obese or pre-diabetic .
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