All posts in Cardiovascular Disease

Higher Muscle Mass Lowers Mortality in Heart Disease

Higher Muscle Mass Lowers Mortality in Heart Disease

According to a new study published in the American Journal of Cardiology, patients with heart disease  who have a higher muscle mass and lower fat mass have a lower mortality risk.

This research was done at the Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. They found that regardless of a person’s measurement of  fat mass, a higher level of muscle mass helps reduce the risk of death.

Data was collected from over 6,000 study  participants.  They were categorized  in one of four groups:

  • low muscle/low fat mass
  • low muscle/high fat mass
  • high muscle/low fat mass
  • high muscle/high fat mass

Those with high muscle mass and low fat mass had the lowest risk of cardiovascular and total mortality. This research highlights the importance of maintaining muscle mass, rather than focusing only on  weight loss, in order to prolong life. The authors of the study suggest that doctors advise patients to participate in resistance exercises to build muscle mass.

For more of the latest in nutritional/ lifestyle research check all of my blog posts at www.drsobo.com/blog

For the best care in Integrative Medicine call Henry C. Sobo, M.D., at 203-348-8805 or write us at optimalhalth@optonline.net

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Nut Consumption Reduces Inflammation

Nut Consumption Reduces Inflammation

A new study published in American Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed that dietary intake of nuts is associated with lower levels of the biomarkers of inflammation. This study of than 5,000 people by the  Brigham and Women’s Hospital  may help to explain the documented health benefits of nuts.

Research study author Ying Bao M.D. ScD, says, “Population studies have consistently supported a protective role of nuts against cardiometabolic disorders such as cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, and we know that inflammation is a key process in the development of these diseases. Our new work suggests that nuts may exert their beneficial effects in part by reducing systemic inflammation.”

For this study, the research team performed  an analysis of data using dietary questionnaires, comparing the levels of the  proteins known as biomarkers in blood samples collected from the study subjects. The biomarkers of inflammation that were affected were, C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin 6 (IL6) .

The data revealed that those who had consumed at least five  servings of nuts per week had lower levels of CRP and IL6 than those who rarely or almost never ate nuts. Dr Bao says, “Much remains unknown about how our diet influences inflammation and, in turn, our risk of disease. But our study supports an overall healthful role for nuts in the diet and suggests reducing inflammation as a potential mechanism that may help explain the benefits of nuts on cardiometabolic diseases.”

For more of the latest in nutritional/ lifestyle research check all of my blog posts at www.drsobo.com/blog

For the best care in Integrative Medicine call Henry C. Sobo, M.D., at 203-348-8805 or write us at optimalhalth@optonline.net



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Moderate coffee drinking linked to reduced risk of death

Moderate coffee drinking linked to reduced risk of death

A study funded by The National Institutes of Health reported  in the medical Journal Circulation shows that people who regularly drink moderate amounts of coffee daily -less than 5 cups per day – lower their risk of death from cardiovascular and neurological diseases, as well as  Type 2 diabetes .

Drinking either caffeinated or decaffeinated coffee was beneficial which suggests that it’s not the caffeine in coffee which is beneficial, but the antioxidants found in coffee beans. Ming Ding, M.D. one of the  the study’s author’s explains, “Bioactive compounds in coffee reduce insulin resistance and systematic inflammation.”

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Testosterone Therapy: “Significant Reduction” in Heart Attack, Stroke Risks

Testosterone Therapy: “Significant Reduction” in Heart Attack, Stroke Risks

A United States  Veterans Affairs  study of greater than 83,000 men found  that men who had  low testosterone levels and received treatment, significantly lower their  risk of heart attack and stroke, or death from any cause. If the men’s testosterone levels were restored to normal, then a dramatic reduction of 56% in the overall death rate was seen in comparison to men whose low testosterone level was never treated . Treatment was found to be effective whether the testosterone prescribed as given via injections, gels, or patches.

There was also a benefit of lesser degree shown in the group of men who were treated with testosterone, but  did not  raise their testosterone levels to normal as shown in repeat testing- their levels were improved but still low.

The study used a follow-up period of from 4.6 to 6.2 years to asses the incidence of illness and deaths reported over that time period.

It was also found that men successfully treated with testosterone  (levels normalized), lowered their incidence of having  a heart attack by  24% and lowered their stroke risk by 36%.

For more of the latest in nutritional/ lifestyle research check all of my blog posts at www.drsobo.com/blog

For the best care in Integrative Medicine call Henry C. Sobo, M.D., at 203-348-8805 or write us at optimalhalth@optonline.net

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High Fructose Corn Syrup Raises Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

High Fructose Corn Syrup Raises Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

Building upon the knowledge obtained from population studies showing an increased risk of cardiovascular disease from the consumption of high fructose corn syrup, a study from the University California Davis has shown for the first time that there is a “dose dependent” relationship between the amount of the sugar consumed, and the increasing risk.

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Zinc Deficiency Promotes Inflammation- Chronic Disease

Zinc Deficiency Promotes Inflammation- Chronic Disease

Just published research from Oregon State University shows that zinc, an important mineral in human health, affects how the immune system responds to stimulation, especially inflammation.

This study reveals a pathway by which zinc deficiency could play a role in chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, cancer and diabetes that involve inflammation.

Such diseases most often show up in older adults, who are more at risk for zinc deficiency. In the study the researchers showed that zinc deficiency caused improper immune cell activation and dysregulation of  IL-6,  a protein that affects the inflammatory response in the cell.

“When you take away zinc, the cells that control inflammation appear to activate and respond differently; this causes the cells to promote more inflammation,” said Professor Emily Ho, lead author of the study from the OSU College of Public Health and Human Sciences,

Zinc is  required for many biological processes in the body , including growth and development, and immunity. It is naturally found in protein-rich foods such as meat and shellfish, with oysters particularly known for their high content.

In the U.S.  of those 65 years of age and older, approximately 40 percent do not consume enough zinc according to Dr Ho, and older adults may  also not absorb or utilize zinc well, making them even more susceptible to the effects of zinc deficiency.

“It’s a double-whammy for older individuals,” said Dr Ho. “We think zinc deficiency is probably a bigger problem than most people realize,” she said. Preventing that deficiency is important.”

Older people, more susceptible to chronic disease from many age related mechanisms are wise to ask their physician to check their zinc status and consider supplementation if deficient.

The findings were published in the journal Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, 2015. 

“For more of the latest in nutritional/ lifestyle research check all of my blog posts at www.drsobo.com/blog

For the best care in Integrative Medicine call Henry C. Sobo, M.D., at 203-348-8805 or write us at optimalhealth@optonline.net

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Peanuts May Benefit Vascular Health Study Shows

Peanuts May Benefit Vascular Health Study Shows

Vascular dysfunction plays a major role in the development of coronary artery disease. Normally some measures of vascular function are temporarily impaired after a high fat meal, until the fat is cleared form the blood. This study measured the response of the body to peanut consumption as a part of a high fat meal, and showed that including peanuts  improved the post-meal triglyceride response, and preserved a healthier functional response of the blood vessels.

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