All posts in Alzheimer’s/Dementia

Dr Sobo’s Blog Wins Recognition Award from the Alzheimer Society

Dr Sobo’s Blog Wins Recognition Award from the Alzheimer Society

I am proud to be named as one of the top Dementia blogs, congratulated by the Alzheimer’s Society. Please see all of the great information available by a variety of writers.Feedspot Blog Reader

Top 60 Dementia Blogs And Websites For People Living With Dementia
http://blog.feedspot.com/dementia_blogs/

Congratulations Winners!!

Doctor Henry Sobo, MD

 

For the best care in Integrative Medicine call Henry C. Sobo, M.D., at 203-348-8805 or write us at optimalhalth@optonline.net

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Mediterranean Diet Prevents Aging of the Brain

Mediterranean Diet Prevents Aging of the Brain

A newly published  study from the University of Edinburgh in Scotland, showed that older people who follow a Mediterranean diet may slow the loss of brain volume which naturally occurs as a  result of aging.

The Mediterranean diet is characterized by relatively  higher amounts of fruits, vegetables, olive oil, beans and whole grain foods. The presence in the Western diet of more processed foods, especially sugars, and hydrogenated oils, has long been thought to promote the development of a range of diseases and aging in general.

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A HEALTHY GUT MAY SAVE YOUR BRAIN AND YOUR LIFE

A HEALTHY GUT MAY SAVE YOUR BRAIN AND YOUR LIFE

 

As a member of the American Academy of Anti Aging Medicine I just attended their 2016 national conference in Las Vegas. I want to bring you crucial information about how the environment of your GI tract, called the Microbiome, may determine whether you are more susceptible to the onset of Alzheimer’s and other Neurodegenerative and other diseases. A great talk about this was presented by David Perlmutter, MD a board certified Neurologist a leader in the field of Natural Medicine as it relates to the mind and how we may be able to help ourselves through non drug therapies.

In tandem with my own experience as well as incorporting Dr. Perlmutter’s presentation of the latest sci4ece , my advice to patients is the following:


1. Take broad spectrum Pre and Probiotics. It’s not just the number of organisms on the bottle, but the variety of species that counts.
2. Avoid sugar. The government’s long campaign against fat has been proven to be an enormous national mistake. Sugar is the culprit.
3. Relieve “leaky gut” inflammation by finding out about your food sensitivities, and avoiding those foods.
3. Get at least 7 hrs of sleep per night. Americans are getting less sleep than ever before, and it’s bad for your brain and your body.

It has always been my passion to prevent disease, not just treat it. I hope to help you learn how to prevent the worst types of illness for which no good treatment exists.

For more of the latest in nutritional/ lifestyle research check all of my blog posts at www.drsobo.com/blog

For the best care in Integrative Medicine call Henry C. Sobo, M.D., at 203-348-8805 or write us at optimalhalth@optonline.net

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Eating A Western Diet Promotes Development of Alzheimer’s Disease

Eating  A Western Diet Promotes Development  of Alzheimer’s Disease

Rates of Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of dementia, are on the rise    worldwide. The most important risk factors seem to be linked to the diet, especially the consumption of meat, sugar, and high-fat dairy products. A review article regarding the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, appearing in  the Journal of the American College of Nutrition  comes to the conclusion that the Western Diet is at least partly responsible for the rise in Alzheimer’s disease.

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Diet and Exercise May Reduce Beta Amyloid in the Brain, Lower Alzheimer’s Risk

Diet and Exercise May Reduce Beta Amyloid in the Brain, Lower Alzheimer’s Risk

A new study published in the  American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry  indicates that a healthy diet and  regular physical activity  may reduce the buildup of a toxic protein Beta amyloid, which is associated with the development of Alzheimer’s Disease.

The research done by the UCLA’s Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior studied 44 adults ranging in age from 40 to 85 who had mild memory changes but did not have the diagnosis of  dementia. The study used  PET scans to assess the amounts of plaque and tangles in the brain which are composed of Beta amyloid, whose buildup is an indicator of Alzheimer’s disease.

They found that several lifestyle factors were linked to lower levels of plaques and tangles on the brain scans. These factors are – maintaining a proper body weight, exercise,  and a Mediterranean diet. The Mediterranean diet is  rich in fruits, nuts, vegetables, legumes, and fish but low in meats and dairy, with mild to moderate alcohol consumption.

Dr. David Merrill, lead author of the study said, “The fact that we could detect this influence of lifestyle at a molecular level before the beginning of serious memory problems surprised us.”

Earlier studies have shown that a healthy lifestyle may result in delaying the onset of Alzheimer’s disease. But this new study is the first to show that these lifestyle factors directly influence the abnormal protein beta amyloid in people with subtle memory loss who do not have dementia. Dr Merrill says, “The study reinforces the importance of living a healthy life to prevent Alzheimer’s, even before the development of clinically significant dementia. This work lends key insight not only into the ability of patients to prevent Alzheimer’s disease, but also physicians’ ability to detect and image these changes.”

For more of the latest in nutritional/ lifestyle research check all of my blog posts at www.drsobo.com/blog

For the best care in Integrative Medicine call Henry C. Sobo, M.D., at 203-348-8805 or write us at optimalhalth@optonline.net

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Brains of Overweight People ‘Ten Years Older’ Study Shows

Brains of Overweight People ‘Ten Years Older’ Study Shows

The team studied data from 473 individuals between the ages of 20 and 87, at the Cambridge Centre for Aging and Neuroscience.

Research study author Dr Lisa Ronan says, “As our brains age, they naturally shrink in size, but it isn’t clear why people who are overweight have a greater reduction in the amount of white matter. We can only speculate on whether obesity might in some way cause these changes… ”

Senior author Professor Paul Fletcher, says “We’re living in an aging population, with increasing levels of obesity, so it’s essential that we establish how these two factors might interact, since the consequences for health are potentially serious. It will also be important to find out whether these changes could be reversible with weight loss, which may well be the case.”

For more of the latest in nutritional/ lifestyle research check all of my blog posts at www.drsobo.com/blog

For the best care in Integrative Medicine call Henry C. Sobo, M.D., at 203-348-8805 or write us at optimalhalth@optonline.net

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Alzheimer Brain May Be Helped By THC In Cannabis

Alzheimer Brain May Be Helped By THC In Cannabis

A study from the Salk Institute, supported by the National Institutes of Health has found evidence that THC (tetrahydrocannabinol)  and other compounds found in marijuana may promote the removal of amyloid beta, the toxic protein associated with Alzheimer’s disease.

Senior researcher  of the paper, Salk Professor David Schubert says, “Although other studies have offered evidence that cannabinoids might be neuroprotective against the symptoms of Alzheimer’s, we believe our study is the first to demonstrate that cannabinoids affect both inflammation and amyloid beta accumulation in nerve cells,”

It is known that amyloid beta accumulates within the nerve cells of the aging brain and is a major component of the plaque deposits that characterize Alzheimer’s Disease.

In this study published in the June 2016 edition of  Aging and Mechanisms of Disease, Salk’s research team studied  laboratory mice whose nerve cells altered to produce high levels of amyloid beta to mimic Alzheimer’s disease. They showed that exposing the cells to THC reduced amyloid beta protein levels, and eliminated the inflammatory response from the nerve cells caused by the protein, preventing nerve cell death.

“Inflammation within the brain is a major component of the damage associated with Alzheimer’s disease,” says researcher Antonio Currais. “When we were able to identify the molecular basis of the inflammatory response to amyloid beta, it became clear that THC-like compounds that the nerve cells make themselves may be involved in protecting the cells from dying.”

Lead author Schubert says that the use of THC-like compounds as a therapy would need to be tested in clinical trials  before nay treatment recommendations could be made by doctors to their patients.

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Stem Cell Treatment Improves Dementia an Motor Impairments of Lewy Body Disease, Study Says

Stem Cell Treatment Improves Dementia an Motor Impairments of Lewy Body Disease, Study Says

Neural stem cells transplanted into areas of brain damage in mice dramatically improved both motor and cognitive impairments associated with  Lewy Body Dementia, according to a study from the University of California Irvine Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders. Their  findings were published in the journal Stem Cell Reports in October 2015

Lewy body Dementia is the second-most common type of age-related dementia after Alzheimer’s disease and is characterized by the accumulation of a protein called alpha-synuclein that collects into masses called Lewy bodies. Lewy bodies are also known to accumulate in other neurologic disorders such as Parkinson’s disease. This pathology impairs the normal function of neurons, leading to alterations in critical brain chemicals and neuronal communication and eventually, to cell death.

In this study mouse neural stem cells were transplanted into genetically modified mice having many of the signs and symptoms  of Lew Body Dementia. One month later, the mice were retested on a variety of behavioral tasks, and significant gains in both motor and cognitive function were observed. For example, these mice could run on a rotating rod for much longer and recognize novel objects far better than untreated mice.

The study examined the effects of the stem cells on brain cell dysfunction. They found that the improvements seen required the production of a specific growth factor  called brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) by neural stem cells.

The team examined two of the key brain structures that become dysfunctional in Lew Body Dementia , dopamine and glutamate making neurons. Lead researcher Natalie Goldberg explained, “Our experiments revealed that neural stem cells can enhance the function of both dopamine and glutamate producing neurons, coaxing the brain cells to connect and communicate more appropriately. This, in turn, facilitates the recovery of both motor and cognitive function.”

Testing the possibility that BDNF alone might be an effective treatment, they studied the effect of delivering  the growth factor directly into to the brains of Lewy Body Dementia mice.

it was found that this treatment resulted in good recovery of motor skills in the test rodents but only limited recovery of cognitive function. This, researcher Goldberg said, suggests that while BDNF is critical to stem cell-mediated motor and cognitive recovery, it does not achieve this outcome alone. It appears that other changes initiated by stem cells are also at play in the mechanisms by which stem cells create the improvements seen.

These results raise the hope that transplantation of BDNF-producing neural stem cells may offer a new approach for treating Lewy Body Dementia and other neurodegenerative conditions.

Although stem cell therapy is currently not yet improved by the FDA for general medical use in the Untied States, the treatment is available to the public through practitioners utilizing IRB approved research protocols.

To learn more about Stem Cell Therapy please view the  information available at

Regenerative Medicine/Stem Cells

For the best care in Integrative Medicine call Henry C. Sobo, M.D., at 203-348-8805 or write us at optimalhalth@optonline.net

 

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