Optimal Health Medical Blog

The Blog of Dr. Henry Sobo

Platelet-Rich Plasma Injections Improve Tissue Healing

Platelet-Rich Plasma Injections Improve Tissue Healing

A study from the University of Alberta Sports Medicine Clinic has shown that  PRP (platelet-rich plasma) injections given to patients  with chronic shoulder pain, not only improved pain and function, but enhanced the healing process in the tissues.  This was the first study to document the enhancement of tissue healing, using before and after MRI studies of the shoulder.

Dr. Doug Gross one of the studies authors says,”Based on MRI findings before and after the injections, we saw improvements in the tissue six months later in five of seven patients undergoing PRP and an appropriate rehabilitation program. The healing in the tissue appeared to correspond with the reported improvement of the pain and also with the clinical assessment of function”

Lead author of the study Marni Wesner, sports medicine physician explained their procedure; “We studied patients 35 to 60 years old with rotator cuff tendinopathy due to normal aging. For the first time, we were able to not only find reported improvements in pain and mobility, but also in the tissue — the MRI before and after showed structural change and a decrease in the size of tears.”

Platelet-rich plasma injection  is an increasingly popular  therapeutic procedure  for the treatment of both acute and chronic  injuries. It involves collecting blood from the patient’s arm, separating the platelets via centrifuge and injecting it back into the patient’s injured tissue area to augment the body’s natural healing response. Treatment with Platelet Rich Plasma has received increased attention after it became known that sports starts like Tiger Woods, Kobe Bryant and Alex -Rodriguez  have been treated with it.

One study subject 58 year old retired police offers Debbie Brown describes her results as life changing “For the past two years, I have tried everything for my right shoulder. Physio would help for a bit but then the problem would still be there. I tried acupuncture, Kinesio tape, cortisol injections — you name it, I’ve tried it,” she said. “Once I did the PRP, it really did fix everything!  I can work out and be active again.PRP makes me feel like I’m in my 20s!”.

For more about PRP treatment at Dr. Sobo’s office see prp http://drsobo.com/dr-sobos-prp-platelet-rich-plasma-program/

For the best care in Integrative Medicine call Henry C. Sobo, M.D., at 203-348-8805 or write us at optimalhalth@optonline.net

 

 

 

More

PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma) Effective Treatment for Knee Osteoarthritis Study Shows

PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma) Effective Treatment for Knee Osteoarthritis Study Shows
A study from the Hospital for Special Surgery published in the Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine shows that platelet-rich plasma (PRP) holds great promise for treating patients with knee osteoarthritis. The treatment consistently improved pain and function, and in nearly ¾ of the study participants appeared to delay the progression of osteoarthritis which is a progressive disease.

“This is a very positive study,” said Brian Halpern, M.D., lead author of the study and chief of Sports Medicine Service at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City.

PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma) is a  new treatment that is being used by a small but growing  number of doctors. PRP, which is  produced from a patient’s own blood is given back into the body as an injection, delivering a high concentration of growth factors to an arthritic joint to stimulate the healing process. Dr Halpern explains the simple procedure this way- “You take a person’s blood, you spin it down, you concentrate the platelets, and you inject a person’s knee with their own platelets in a concentrated form. This then activates growth factors and stem cells to help repair the tissue, if possible, calm osteoarthritic symptoms and decrease inflammation.”

In the study, researchers enrolled patients with early osteoarthritis, gave them each an injection of PRP , and then monitored them for one year. They used validated measures to assess overall knee pain, stiffness and function, as well as a patient’s ability to perform various activities of daily living. At baseline and then one year after the PRP injection, physicians also evaluated the knee cartilage with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

It is generally accepted  that patients with osteoarthritis lose roughly five percent of knee cartilage per year, the Hospital for Special Surgery investigators found that a large majority of patients in their study had no further cartilage loss after one year.

Treatment with PRP was also useful in improving pain, stiffness and function with a reduction of between 42 % nearly 60 % at six months and one year. Activity of Daily Living Scores also showed a significant increase at both six months (47%) and one year (56%).

Dr. Halpern said, “We are entering into an era of biologic treatment…, where you can use your own cells to try to help repair your other cells, rather than using a substance that is artificial. The downside is next to zero and the upside is huge.”

Osteoarthritis impacts nearly 30 million Americans and is a leading cause of disability. It affects a third of those older than 65. The disease is characterized by degeneration of cartilage and its underlying bone within a joint as well as bony overgrowth.

For more about PRP treatment see prp http://drsobo.com/dr-sobos-prp-platelet-rich-plasma-program/

For the best care in Integrative Medicine call Henry C. Sobo, M.D., at 203-348-8805 or write us at optimalhalth@optonline.net

 

 

More

Obesity Linked To More Types of Cancer

Obesity Linked To More Types of Cancer

As reported in The New England Journal of Medicine, researchers have identified eight additional types of cancer linked to excess weight and obesity: stomach, liver, gall bladder, pancreas, ovary, meningioma , thyroid cancer and the blood cancer multiple myeloma. And the data suggests that avoiding obesity could help to reduce the risk of these cancers.

This study utilizing researchers around the world, reviewed more than 1,000 studies of excess weight and cancer risk analyzed by the WHO’s International Agency for Cancer on Research. In 2002, this same group of cancer researchers found  evidence linking excess weight to higher risks of cancers of the colon, esophagus, kidney, breast and uterus.

Graham Colditz, MD, DrPH, a cancer prevention expert at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis says,”The burden of cancer due to being overweight or obese is more extensive than what has been assumed. Many of the newly identified cancers linked to excess weight haven’t been on people’s radar screens as having a weight component.”

“Lifestyle factors such as eating a healthy diet, maintaining a healthy weight and exercising, in addition to not smoking, can have a significant impact on reducing cancer risk” he said. “Public health efforts to combat cancer should focus on these things that people have some control over.”

For most of the cancers on the newly expanded list, the researchers also see that greater the degree of being overweight,  the greater the cancer risk. And the cancer risk that the study found, the same for both men and women.

“Significant numbers of the U.S. and the world’s population are overweight,” Dr. Colditz says. “This is another wake-up call. It’s time to take our health and our diets seriously.”

For more of the latest in nutritional/ lifestyle research check all of my blog posts at www.drsobo.com/blog

For the best care in Integrative Medicine call Henry C. Sobo, M.D., at 203-348-8805 or write us at optimalhalth@optonline.net

 

More

Diet and Exercise May Reduce Beta Amyloid in the Brain, Lower Alzheimer’s Risk

Diet and Exercise May Reduce Beta Amyloid in the Brain, Lower Alzheimer’s Risk

A new study published in the  American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry  indicates that a healthy diet and  regular physical activity  may reduce the buildup of a toxic protein Beta amyloid, which is associated with the development of Alzheimer’s Disease.

The research done by the UCLA’s Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior studied 44 adults ranging in age from 40 to 85 who had mild memory changes but did not have the diagnosis of  dementia. The study used  PET scans to assess the amounts of plaque and tangles in the brain which are composed of Beta amyloid, whose buildup is an indicator of Alzheimer’s disease.

They found that several lifestyle factors were linked to lower levels of plaques and tangles on the brain scans. These factors are – maintaining a proper body weight, exercise,  and a Mediterranean diet. The Mediterranean diet is  rich in fruits, nuts, vegetables, legumes, and fish but low in meats and dairy, with mild to moderate alcohol consumption.

Dr. David Merrill, lead author of the study said, “The fact that we could detect this influence of lifestyle at a molecular level before the beginning of serious memory problems surprised us.”

Earlier studies have shown that a healthy lifestyle may result in delaying the onset of Alzheimer’s disease. But this new study is the first to show that these lifestyle factors directly influence the abnormal protein beta amyloid in people with subtle memory loss who do not have dementia. Dr Merrill says, “The study reinforces the importance of living a healthy life to prevent Alzheimer’s, even before the development of clinically significant dementia. This work lends key insight not only into the ability of patients to prevent Alzheimer’s disease, but also physicians’ ability to detect and image these changes.”

For more of the latest in nutritional/ lifestyle research check all of my blog posts at www.drsobo.com/blog

For the best care in Integrative Medicine call Henry C. Sobo, M.D., at 203-348-8805 or write us at optimalhalth@optonline.net

More

Higher Muscle Mass Lowers Mortality in Heart Disease

Higher Muscle Mass Lowers Mortality in Heart Disease

According to a new study published in the American Journal of Cardiology, patients with heart disease  who have a higher muscle mass and lower fat mass have a lower mortality risk.

This research was done at the Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. They found that regardless of a person’s measurement of  fat mass, a higher level of muscle mass helps reduce the risk of death.

Data was collected from over 6,000 study  participants.  They were categorized  in one of four groups:

  • low muscle/low fat mass
  • low muscle/high fat mass
  • high muscle/low fat mass
  • high muscle/high fat mass

Those with high muscle mass and low fat mass had the lowest risk of cardiovascular and total mortality. This research highlights the importance of maintaining muscle mass, rather than focusing only on  weight loss, in order to prolong life. The authors of the study suggest that doctors advise patients to participate in resistance exercises to build muscle mass.

For more of the latest in nutritional/ lifestyle research check all of my blog posts at www.drsobo.com/blog

For the best care in Integrative Medicine call Henry C. Sobo, M.D., at 203-348-8805 or write us at optimalhalth@optonline.net

More

Brains of Overweight People ‘Ten Years Older’ Study Shows

Brains of Overweight People ‘Ten Years Older’ Study Shows

The team studied data from 473 individuals between the ages of 20 and 87, at the Cambridge Centre for Aging and Neuroscience.

Research study author Dr Lisa Ronan says, “As our brains age, they naturally shrink in size, but it isn’t clear why people who are overweight have a greater reduction in the amount of white matter. We can only speculate on whether obesity might in some way cause these changes… ”

Senior author Professor Paul Fletcher, says “We’re living in an aging population, with increasing levels of obesity, so it’s essential that we establish how these two factors might interact, since the consequences for health are potentially serious. It will also be important to find out whether these changes could be reversible with weight loss, which may well be the case.”

For more of the latest in nutritional/ lifestyle research check all of my blog posts at www.drsobo.com/blog

For the best care in Integrative Medicine call Henry C. Sobo, M.D., at 203-348-8805 or write us at optimalhalth@optonline.net

More

Nut Consumption Reduces Inflammation

Nut Consumption Reduces Inflammation

A new study published in American Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed that dietary intake of nuts is associated with lower levels of the biomarkers of inflammation. This study of than 5,000 people by the  Brigham and Women’s Hospital  may help to explain the documented health benefits of nuts.

Research study author Ying Bao M.D. ScD, says, “Population studies have consistently supported a protective role of nuts against cardiometabolic disorders such as cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, and we know that inflammation is a key process in the development of these diseases. Our new work suggests that nuts may exert their beneficial effects in part by reducing systemic inflammation.”

For this study, the research team performed  an analysis of data using dietary questionnaires, comparing the levels of the  proteins known as biomarkers in blood samples collected from the study subjects. The biomarkers of inflammation that were affected were, C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin 6 (IL6) .

The data revealed that those who had consumed at least five  servings of nuts per week had lower levels of CRP and IL6 than those who rarely or almost never ate nuts. Dr Bao says, “Much remains unknown about how our diet influences inflammation and, in turn, our risk of disease. But our study supports an overall healthful role for nuts in the diet and suggests reducing inflammation as a potential mechanism that may help explain the benefits of nuts on cardiometabolic diseases.”

For more of the latest in nutritional/ lifestyle research check all of my blog posts at www.drsobo.com/blog

For the best care in Integrative Medicine call Henry C. Sobo, M.D., at 203-348-8805 or write us at optimalhalth@optonline.net



More

Genes Not Always Responsible for Diseases That Run in Families

Genes Not Always Responsible for Diseases That Run in Families

Family history of a disease may be as much the consequence of individuals sharing a similar diet and lifestyle as compared to the effect of their common inherited genes, according to new research published in the journal Nature Genetics.

Researchers at the University of Edinburgh’s Roslin Institute and MRC Human Genetics Unit studied the medical histories of more than 500,000 people and their families. Their data revealed that a number of non genetic factors that are common to the family environment – the shared living space and similar eating habits — make a major contribution to a person’s risk of disease.

Previous studies have identified genes that are linked to numerous medical conditions, but by not accounting for shared environmental factors, these studies  may overestimate the importance of inherited genes by nearly 50 per cent, they  found.

They looked at incidents of 12 common diseases including high blood pressure, heart disease, and several cancers and neurological diseases.

They hope that  their findings will help to provide realistic expectations of the value of genetic testing for identifying people at risk for a variety of diseases.

This research also brings to light the need to identify environmental factors that contribute to diseases so that we can study how to modify these factors to reduce the risk.

Professor Chris Haley, of the University’s MRC Human Genetics Unit, said, “The huge UK Biobank study allowed us to obtain very precise estimates of the role of genetics in these important diseases. It also identified those diseases where the shared family environment is important, such as heart disease, hypertension and depression, and also equally interestingly those where family environment is of limited or no apparent importance, such as … Parkinson’s disease.”

For more of the latest in nutritional/ lifestyle research check all of my blog posts at www.drsobo.com/blog

For the best care in Integrative Medicine call Henry C. Sobo, M.D., at 203-348-8805 or write us at optimalhalth@optonline.net

More

Moderate Better than Strenuous Exercise for Preventing Diabetes, Study Suggests

Moderate Better than Strenuous Exercise for Preventing Diabetes, Study Suggests

A new study from Duke University published in the journal Diabetologia, suggests that walking briskly may be more effective than  jogging for improving glucose control for individuals who are pre-diabetic.

One hundred and fifty individuals who were diagnosed with pre-diabetes were studied for 6 months. To assess the effect of the different types of exercise on blood glucose levels, they divided participants into three groups who given the  instructions for engaging in different types of exercise, and told not change their diets . One group was labeled  low-amount of exercise at moderate intensity (walking briskly for 7.5 miles per week). Another group was labeled high-amount of exercise at  moderate intensity (walking briskly for 11.5 miles per week). And the third group was labeled high-amount at vigorous intensity (jogging for 11.5 miles per week).

Researcher Dr William Kraus says, “We wanted to know …  which intensity of exercise is better for controlling metabolism in individuals at risk for diabetes.”

Participants in the moderate-intensity, 11.5-mile group saw a 7 percent improvement in glucose tolerance on average. The moderate-intensity, 7.5-mile group had a 5 percent improvement on average. The lowest improvement was seen among those in the vigorous-intensity, 11.5-mile group, with only a 2 percent average

Research author Willian Kraus explains, “High-intensity exercise tends to burn glucose more than fat, while moderate-intensity exercise tends to burn fat more than glucose. We believe that one benefit of moderate-intensity exercise is that it burns off fat in the muscles, which relieves the block of glucose uptake by the muscles. That’s important because muscle is the major place to store glucose after a meal.”

The study’s authors say that further study would be needed to determine whether moderate-intensity exercise is actually superior to high-intensity exercise at preventing those  pre-diabetes from progressing to full blown diabetes.

Dr Kraus says that  the study’s results could provide manageable alternatives for pre-diabetic patients. “When faced with the decision of trying to do weight loss, diet, and exercise versus exercise alone, the study indicates you can achieve nearly 80 percent of the effect of doing all three with just a high amount of moderate-intensity exercise.”

For more of the latest in nutritional/ lifestyle research check all of my blog posts at www.drsobo.com/blog

For the best care in Integrative Medicine call Henry C. Sobo, M.D., at 203-348-8805 or write us at optimalhalth@optonline.net

More

Vitamin D Benefits People with Multiple Sclerosis

Vitamin D Benefits People with Multiple Sclerosis

It has long been known that  vitamin D deficiency is linked to an increased risk of developing Multiple Sclerosis. And also, it has been shown that people who already have MS and low levels of vitamin D are more likely to have greater disability and a worse prognosis in terms of the progression of the disease.

Another study showing the relationship of Vitanin D and  Multiple Sclerosis has been published in the Journal Neurology.

Researchers at Johns Hopkins gave the study subjects, 40 people with relapsing-remitting MS, either 10,400 IU  or 800 IU of vitamin D3 supplements daily for six months.  Blood tests at the start of the study and again at three and six months measured the amount of vitamin D in the blood and the response in the immune system’s T cells, which play a key role in MS. The people taking the high dose had a reduction in the percentage of inflammatory T cells related to MS severity,  The people taking the low dose did not have any noticeable changes in the percentages of their T cell subsets.

“We hope that these changes in inflammatory T cell responses translate to a reduced severity of disease,” said lead study author Peter Calabresi, MD.  “Other clinical trials are underway to determine if that is the case. More research is needed to confirm these findings with larger groups of people and to help us understand the mechanisms for these effects, but the results are promising. Vitamin D has the potential to be an inexpensive, safe and convenient treatment for people with MS”.

For more of the latest in nutritional/ lifestyle research check all of my blog posts at www.drsobo.com/blog

For the best care in Integrative Medicine call Henry C. Sobo, M.D., at 203-348-8805 or write us at optimalhalth@optonline.net

 

 

 

Johns Hopkins Medicine.

  1.  P. A. Calabresi. Safety and immunologic effects of high- vs low-dose cholecalciferol in multiple sclerosis. Neurology, 2015; DOI
More